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What Are Inverter Heat Pumps?

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Inverter Heat Pump

When installing heat pumps at home, it makes sense to do your research to figure out the perfect system for you. Inverter heat pumps are just one heat pump type, but they’re proving to be a popular choice with homeowners thanks to their efficiency, their use of renewable energy and lack of reliance on fossil fuels. But what are inverter heat pumps, and how do they differ from other types of heat pump? 

Below we’ll explore all that and more, so you can decide if an inverter heat pump is a wise next home improvement for you. And if you think it is, you can then compare the best heat pump deals with us, right here at Heat Pumps UK . 

How Heat Pumps Work 

If you’ve already started researching heat pumps, then the chances are you’ll know a little about how they work, but in case you haven’t, let’s give you a brief overview of how they operate more generally. 

Heat pumps work by using the ambient temperature of the outside air, and then transferring that heat indoors to warm your home. It essentially draws in the air from outside, trapping the heat through compressing and condensing, and then releases that heat into your home.

In summer, it works in the opposite direction, drawing in air, but releasing the heat back outside. Essentially it acts like a giant fridge or air conditioning unit, holding on to the cold, and releasing the heat.

Difference Between Inverter Heat Pumps & Fixed Output Heat Pumps 

Regular, fixed output heat pumps continually turn on and off throughout the process, turning on to full power when the heat pump needs to draw in air and extract the heat to release it either inside the home or outside. As soon as the thermostat recognises that the temperature in your home is where it ought to be, the heat pump will completely power off once more. It’ll then repeat that process constantly.

Inverter heat pumps are different. Also known by a different name, which gives some clue as to how they work: variable-speed heat pumps, rather than switching on and off, inverter heat pumps run at variable speeds constantly, so they can analyse conditions in the home consistently, and adjust how hard to work on a sliding scale from 0-100. 

Effectively, they’re much more efficient at heating and cooling because the variable speed compressor means they’re able to respond to conditions in your home much quicker than traditional heat pumps can – which need to power up first before they even get started. This method reduces energy consumption whilst maintaining a more consistent perfect temperature in your home, so it’s more comfortable for you, too. 

Advantages Of Inverter Heat Pumps

Now you know how they work, it’s worth looking at the advantages of inverter technology so you can decide if they’re the right option for you.

Energy Efficient 

It sounds counterintuitive that a heat pump that is effectively always on will have better energy efficiency than one that turns on and off as required, but it’s true. 

An inverter heat pump is constantly active, but that means it rarely operates with 100% maximum output, meaning there’s no large fluctuations in power, unlike with fixed output heat pumps which go from 0-100 and back again multiple times a day, but don’t fall on a scale in the same way inverter heat pumps do. With fixed output heat pumps, it’s quite literally all or nothing, making them a less energy efficient heating option. 

That large surge in power costs a lot more energy than an inverter heat pump which only fluctuates slightly throughout the day with the inverter technology responding to small changes in temperature. 

Savings Through Reduced Energy Consumption

If you’re using less energy to power your heat pump, then it follows that you’ll spend less money on your energy bills. Having such an efficient heating and cooling system is better for your home and your bank balance. 

Quieter Operation 

Another thing to notice is that an inverter heat pump will be constantly working, but in a MUCH quieter way than a fixed output heat pump which turns on and off, but makes a LOT of noise as it does so.

If you’ve found that heat pumps have disturbed you in the past, then you’ll find this type of heat pump to be much more agreeable. 

Steady Supply Of Clean Air

Air quality is important in any home, and it’s been suggested that inverter heat pumps actually improve air quality in the home much more than other heat pumps do. Why? Because it’s constantly working to monitor slight changes in the temperature, it’s constantly drawing in fresh air, too. 

This steady supply of clean air can make your home a much more enjoyable, refreshing place to be.

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Is An Inverter Heat Pump Right For Me? 

Almost certainly – especially if you live in a more modern home with efficient insulation already. In order for any heat pump to be installed at your property, you must already have a well-insulated home for it to work efficiently, and inverter heat pumps are no different. 

You’ll also need to think about space in your home, because a complete inverter heat pump system will take up considerable room, what with the requirements to install larger radiators or underfloor heating for a more efficient system. If space is at a premium in your home, then you might want to consider another heating system instead. 

Besides these few conditions, inverter heat pumps are usually suitable for most homes, so if you’re interested in installing them, work with Heat Pumps UK so we can find you the best deals and put you in touch with expert heat pump installers near you.

Inverter Heat Pump Costs

Wondering how much inverter heat pumps cost in the UK? Well, that depends on the exact heating system you choose, the size of it, and the labour costs to install it on top of that. 

  • For an inverter heat pump alone, you can expect to pay anywhere from £2,000 to £10,000 depending on the size and manufacturer, etc. 
  • For a full system, including labour costs to install your inverter heat pump, you’ll probably be looking at between £6,000 and £15,000

But here at Heat Pumps UK, we’re heat pump experts that can help you find the best deals on heat pumps, sometimes saving you £1000s. Reach out today and we’ll do our best to find you a price you can work with. 

Inverter Heat Summary

Inverter heat pumps work a little differently to fixed output heat pumps, but they both do essentially the same job of producing heat energy, just in different ways. 

Inverter heat pumps are superior to other heat pump options in that they’re more energy efficient and can respond quicker to temperature changes, so your home is at the desired temperature and more comfortable as a result. Add in the fact that you’ll save more money (so they’ll pay for themselves in the long run even faster) and that they operate much quieter than other heat pumps, and you can understand why they’re becoming more popular with homeowners just like you. 

With that said, ALL heat pumps have a range of benefits in common, including that they’re better for the planet, better for your bank balance, and better for your home than traditional heating systems that rely on fossil fuels to run. 

So, whether an inverter heat pump is for you or not, compare heat pump deals with us today, and we’ll find you the right option for you, so you can enjoy the right temperature in your home and the full range of benefits heat pumps can bring your way. 

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Ollie Creevy
Ollie has been writing content online about home improvements for over 3 years. With a real interest and in-depth knowledge of heat pumps and ECO home improvement measures you can use to save on your energy bills. Ollie also keeps up to date with all the Government grants available for you to take advantage of like ECO4 and the Boiler Upgrade Scheme.